29 May 2014

Great design is serious (not solemn): Paula Scher

Splitting hairs over the distinction between "serious" and "solemn," Scher argues that great design comes from being serious but not solemn.

All children have serious play, it is the grown ups who force them to become solemn.

Great design is serious (not solemn): Paula Scher

20 May 2014

The first 20 hours -- how to learn anything: Josh Kaufman

Traditional research tells us that it takes about 10,000 hours to become an expert at something (that is 40 hours a week for about 5 years). Kaufman suggests instead of trying to become an "expert," we should focus simply on being reasonably good which only takes about 20 hours. To do this:

  1. Deconstruct the skill into smaller components. This will give you manageable pieces to practice on a daily basis.
  2. Learn enough to self-correct. Kaufman suggests getting three to five sources that will give you enough information to able to know when you are making a mistake.
  3. Remove distraction.
  4. Practice at least 20 hours. The commitment will help you overcome the frustration barrier.


The first 20 hours -- how to learn anything: Josh Kaufman

15 May 2014

The hidden meanings in kids' movies: Colin Stokes

Stokes presents a blunt discussion about how movies, particularly childrens' movies, are melding our children, and society in general, in a negative way.

The hidden meanings in kids' movies: Colin Stokes

06 May 2014

Mike Rowe: Learning from dirty jobs

Rowe shapes a humorous story of castration and enlightenment as he argues that we, as a society, have waged a war on work. We try so hard to avoid work when it is work that allows us to experience "anagnorisis" and "peripeteia" (a great self discovery of personal identity and a reversal of behavior caused by that discovery).

Mike Rowe: Learning from dirty jobs